How to Bring Liquidity Into an Economy, Free of Interest, Inflation, and Boom and Bust Cycles

Abstract
Most economies suffer from a lack of liquidity, especially outside the large corporate and government sectors. This lack of means of payment (liquidity) is a fundamental cause of unemployment and failures of small and medium sized businesses (SMEs). It generally derives from flaws that are inherent in the centrally controlled systems of money and finance and the increasing indebtedness of both the private and public sectors. The surrender of monetary sovereignty by national governments to central banks, and to currency unions, such as the Euro, and their increasing indebtedness, as in  as in the case of Greece, have made it virtually impossible for their economies to thrive.

This article describes how domestic or community liquidity, i.e., means of payment, that enable the process of reciprocal exchange of value, can be created by various entities at various levels, from communities and business associations, to municipal governments and agencies, to national governments. The main obstacles to their implementation are not economic, but organizational and political, yet there is still considerable leeway within which the value of local production can be monetized in the form of circulating private currencies and trade credits created within associations of buyers and sellers. This article describes how that can be done.

Read the complete article here.

This subject will be the main focus of my upcoming workshop in Greece, 16-23 June. You still have time to register and space is still available.

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One response to “How to Bring Liquidity Into an Economy, Free of Interest, Inflation, and Boom and Bust Cycles

  1. Ah, if only Greeks had somebody high up with power who could commit to what you have explained so clearly. If they had done it 2 years ago when Syrzia were elected by now the worst would have been over and they would have started to properly recover.

    jock >

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