Category Archives: Emerging paradigm

Who’s Reset will it be?

The oligarchs, plutocrats, and technocrats have a plan for you. It’s been called the “New World Order,” and now, “The Great Reset” which is being promoted by the World Economic Forum. Despite their high sounding rhetoric, you and I will have no role in formulating this plan, rather it is self-elected “global leaders” who will “come together to design a common recovery path and shape the Great Reset.”

It is imperative the people around the world come together now to plan our own future, one that is based on our own common values, needs, and a shared vision of how humans can live in harmony with nature and with each other. One current initiative that intends to facilitate that effort is “The Greater Reset” which is upcoming starting Monday, January 25th and continuing through Friday, January 29th.

Our World. Our Way.

The Greater Reset Activation: January 25th – 29th, 2021

“The Greater Reset is the world’s collective response to the World Economic Forum’s Initiative: The Great Reset.

“We offer an alternative to the WEF’s top-down, centralized, authoritarian vision. Our desire is to help all people find community and liberty by providing practical steps and knowledge for co-creating a world that respects individual liberty, bodily autonomy, and choice. We invite you to join us for 5 days of discussion about the diverse opportunities available for those who seek to live in harmony with humanity and the planet, while respecting our innate freedom.”

You can get program details, and sign up for “The Greater Reset” at https://thegreaterreset.org/

Sovereign or Slave? How perversion of the money power has decided the issue—until now!

As I indicated in my previous post, No democracy when government has the money power, E. C. Riegel, more than 75 years ago, explained, better than anyone else I’ve encountered, the nature of money, its fundamental function, and the history and consequences of its politicization, and outlined a way of transcending the perverse and dysfunctional system that we have lived under for far too long. His work is perhaps best summarized in his book, Private Enterprise Money, from which I quoted. I continue here with further quotes that elucidate the key points of sovereignty, money and government.

Riegel’s solution involved the organization of credit clearing circles that he called “Valun Exchanges” that would be joined together in networks for exchanging goods and services. He argues, as I do, that it is the individual person that is sovereign, not any king, emperor or government, and that the power to issue money, therefore, also resides in the individual. When we realize that money is really only short-term credit, it becomes clear that it is in our power as individuals to give it or withhold it as we go about our daily business of exchanging the value (goods and services) we produce and consume.

In Chapter 9 of his book, Riegel proposes that the Valun Exchanges be organized on a “state-wise” basis. He observes that:  “The sovereign power of the citizen rises to the state government; and from there it is delegated upward to the federal government, and downward to subdivisions. We are, first of all, citizens of our respective states; and this implies citizenship also in local and national governments.” p. 139

He then recounts the history of the union of the American colonies after their separation from British rule and argues that: “The advantage in abolishing this multiplicity of monies [of the various colonies] was obvious, but the implications involved in surrendering the money issuing power to the federal government was not comprehended. The gain to all in uniformity of money unit was visualized; the loss in sovereignty thereby suffered, was not.”  p. 140

From this point onward, I will let Riegel’s words speak for themselves. All page number refer to the printed edition.

“We now realize that the money power of the private citizen is in fact his sovereignty; and that in yielding it he yields his sovereignty. Thus the transferring of the money power from the states to the federal government was the transferring of the citizens’ sovereignty to the national government, and the reducing of the state to the status of a subordinate. p. 140

“The political money system implies that the citizen will abate his natural money issuing power, and make the criterion of his exchanges and the regulation of the money system entirely dependent upon the government that he recognizes as the money power. By making the federal government the sole money issuing power, the individual states transferred the fealty of their citizens to the national government, because they became thereby dependent upon its money power. The citizen having thus had his fealty transferred to the national  government—it was taken from the state governments—and the latter are now dismayed by the increase of federal power and the commensurate subordination of state power.”

“What has actually transpired is a reversal of the intent of the federal plan whereby the national government was to be dependent upon the states for grants of power. The national government, through its money power, is now supreme and in reality holds the state governments in subjection to it. Federal fiscal policy now determines the bounds of state sovereignty. It took many years to reveal this structural weakness because, in the earlier days of the federation, the economy depended more upon the private issuance of money through the banking system, and thus federal fiscal power was dormant. The policy of the federal government up to 1932 was to leave to the banks the function of supplying money. During the Jackson administration, with the abolishment of the United States Bank, government participation in money supply reached its lowest point—with the government confining itself to the mere minting of gold and silver coins at a seigniorage charge to any one who brought the metal to the mint.” pp. 140-141.

Money Power Is Sovereignty
The states, to recapture their independence and sovereignty, must look to their citizens who, in turn, must assert their sovereignty by exercising their inherent money power. It was right that the states should have surrendered their money power; but they should have surrendered it to their citizens, and not to another government. At the time the federation was formed the nature of the money power was not understood; and it was not realized that it is the essence of sovereignty. But we know now that it is and if we wish to preserve the federation and also home rule, we must now deal intelligently with the money power.

While the states have surrendered their money power, their citizens have not. The citizens have merely failed to exercise their natural powers against which there is no prohibition in either state or federal constitutions. This is not a political issue – requiring legislation or repeal of legislation, or constitutional amendments, or any official action – but it is, nevertheless, a profound political movement; because, as the people assert their money power, their natural intimacy with their state and local governments asserts itself – since there is no other power that can step between. Today, the federal government stands between the citizen and local government, and thus alienates him.

If our states are to develop their individuality and counter the stereotyping influence of a monetary dictatorship, if local government and private enterprise are to work out their natural virtues, if democracy is to prevail in business and government, and if our federal republican system is to survive, we must meet our problems by dealing with their fundamental causes – the political money system.”

To accomplish these broad and vital aims, the Governor or some other public official should take the leadership of this cause within his state. In the absence of this, leadership must be taken by private citizens. It offers an incomparable opportunity for public service.”

While the money issuing power is inherent in every man, it can be realized only by a pact among many. Therefore, the individual is helpless, and organized action is necessary. The method of organizing a Valun Exchange should be no different from organizing any other cooperative movement.” pp. 143-144.

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Get Ready to Play in the Butterfly Economy

Presentation by Thomas H. Greco, Jr. to the (virtual) 2020 Annual Convention of the International Reciprocal Trade Association (IRTA.) on September 24, 2020.

Orthodoxy and the meaning of events

Orthodoxy and the meaning of events is the title of an article recently published by Richard K. Moore, author of Escaping the Matrix: how We the People can change the world, and numerous insightful articles that are helpful in making sense of the present state of our world.

Here are some excerpts:

When something dramatic happens, we want to know what it means. We want answers to questions like: Why is it happening? How important is it? What will happen next? Where is it heading? What does it all mean?

In the mainstream narrative, the orthodox narrative, a clear meaning is always provided, right along with the news of the dramatic event itself. Like on the morning of 9/11, when the video of the explosions was first being shown, there was already a banner going across the screen: America under attack by Al Qaeda. And soon after: They want to destroy our democracy. 

This prompt assignment of meaning to an event has an important psychological effect. The first plausible explanation someone hears tends to fix in the subconscious, and resists being displaced by later explanations. That’s why the orthodox meaning is provided promptly, is repeated endlessly, and is reinforced from a variety angles by the various media genre, such as news broadcasts, talk shows, official announcements, comedians, documentaries, interviews, newspapers, etc.

It is easy to see why followers of the mainstream media would consider themselves to be well informed citizens. On any big public topic, they know what it means, and from that framework they can discuss this or that development from a knowing perspective, with a sense of knowing what they’re talking about. 

The world of the mainstream narrative is to a large extent a closed universe. Its stories and their meanings cover the whole scope of ‘what’s important’ and there’s no room for alternative explanations to find a place there. If a contrary explanation emerges from some non-mainstream source, there are many reasons why the explanation will be dismissed. First: ‘We already have an explanation for that’. Perhaps next: ‘Who are you that thinks you know better than the world’s experts?’ Every source that is non-mainstream is automatically suspect.

Moore goes on the say that:

In the orthodox world big changes always come as a response to some unexpected crisis (eg Pearl Harbor, 9/11, WMDs, 2008 collapse, COVID). A crisis is identified, it is given a meaning, and changes are announced. And then another crisis comes along, and again we get big changes. Each crisis comes with its own little meaning story, unrelated to the meaning of the crisis that came before or the one that comes after. Society stumbles along, it seems, always responding to unexpected crises. 

If someone observes that there is a pattern in such sequence, they are dismissed as paranoid or a “conspiracy theorist,” and that “conversations of any significant kind are nearly impossible across the boundary of the orthodox bubble.”

So much of each person’s worldview is based on the trust they have in the sources of the information they regularly consume, whether is MSNBC, Fox News, the BBC, New York Times, the Washington Post or other long established sources with big reputations. But it has been well documented how the media channels throughout the world have been gradually absorbed into a few mega-corporations, and how the owners of those channels use them in the process of Manufacturing Consent to the demands of the elite class that they represent, and their power has become greatly enlarged in the years since Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky, described it in their book by that name. That, and other aspects of the decline of western civilization since the 1970’s is also well documented in a video I watched recently titled, HEIST Who Stole the American Dream.

Richard Moore’s article concludes with his views on how people with differing beliefs about reality might talk with one another in a productive way. I strongly recommend that readers take the time to digest the entire article which can be found on Moore’s website.

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2020 August Newsletter — The Great Reset is now underway

My August newsletter has been sent out a few days ago by email to my list. Here are the contents:
In this issue:

  • First, something to amuse and brighten your day…
  • Now, on a more serious note…
  • What to do…?
  • Clarifying and filling in the picture…

You can read the entire newsletter here.

And, here is a more extensive consideration by Chris Talgo of the Great Reset that is being put forth by the World Economic Forum:  What is the Great Reset?

If you’d like to be added to my mailing list to receive my newsletter directly, please fill out the subscription form below.

Walking Away: From the “New (Old) World Order,” into the Old (New) World Order. Part II

ConfusedDirections

Discord and confusion, conflicting stories, rampant disinformation, faction against faction,  widespread anger and fear, people fighting among themselves, economic dislocation, personal interactions disrupted and people separated from friends and family, cessation of favorite sports and pastimes, and widespread abandonment of familiar ways of doing things. That is the state of our world today.

How have we come to this sorry pass and to what is it leading? Is this an act of God, is it the natural course of societal evolution, or is it something that has been intentionally contrived, and if so, by whom and to what purpose?

Read the full article here

Walking Away: From the “New (Old) World Order,” into the Old (New) World Order. Part I

ObeySleep1

Global pandemic, social distancing, widespread shut-downs, testing and “tracing,” economic crisis, and more recently, massive protests and social unrest, not just in the US, but around the world — What does it all mean? Like virtually everyone else in the world, my attention lately has been focused on that question.

I don’t feel terribly anxious about Covid-19, even though for me personally it poses a significant existential threat. Although I’m fortunate to have no chronic illnesses, I am well advanced in years, and according to some recent reports, my gender, blood type, and ethnic heritage may put me further at risk.

I am more concerned about the social, political and economic impacts of the situation and governments’ reactions to it which may turn out to be more disruptive than the pandemic itself. At the same time I am hopeful, even optimistic, that this crisis brings with it great opportunities for positive changes that are long overdue.

Read the full article here

Reclaiming the Credit Commons

The concept of the “credit commons” is something I articulated at length in my 2009 book The End of Money and the Future of Civilization, along with a thorough description of how it can be reclaimed from monopoly control. In November of 2010 I was invited to participate in the International Commons Conference: Constructing a Commons Based Policy Platform Economy, sponsored by the Heinrich Böll Foundation, in Berlin, Germany.

In my presentation there I pointed out that credit is a crucial aspect of the commons that has been generally overlooked, and that reclaiming it is crucial to any attempt to promote social justice, economic equity, democratic government and a world that works for everyone.

This video is a composite of the video record that was made and the slides that I showed at that time. It can also be viewed at Credit Commons on YouTube.

Newsletter — June 2020: Making sense of the Covid-19 “pandemic”

In this issue:

  • Facts about Covid-19, a report from Swiss Policy Research
  • Analysis of Crisis Management from the German Ministry of Interior
  • Perspectives on the pandemic, one nurse speaks out
  • Mass surveillance begins with kids: WIRED Magazine
  • The injection fraud–it’s not a vaccine: Catherine Austin Fitts
  • All Governments Lie: Oliver Stone
  • Meet Bill Gates: The Corbett Report
  • Coronavirus: It is governments not coronavirus which threatens our lives: Dr. Vernon Coleman
  • My (tentative) final thoughts

Because this is a long one I’ve posted only the list of contents. You can read the entire newsletter here.

If you’d like to be added to my mailing list to receive my newsletter directly, please fill out the subscription form below.

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Relocalization and Community Empowerment–How to get it done

You won’t want to miss this webinar with
GAYLE MCLAUGHLIN for a conversation on
How a Progressive Alliance Can Change Culture

Gayle McLaughlin was a two term Mayor of Richmond, CA and she is currently running for the Richmond City Council in 2020. Under her leadership as Mayor, Richmond increased the minimum wage to $15 an hour in 2008. Homicides were reduced by 70%, and the Richmond Chevron refinery was forced to pay $100 million dollars in additional taxes after a successful lawsuit that required payment for the environmental hazards and harm they caused to the community. She led the fight against foreclosures in Richmond. She co-founded the Richmond Progressive Alliance, which was the precursor to the California Progressive Alliance. As Mayor, she also oversaw the hiring of a new police chief who radically altered the police culture in their community by reorganizing the police force to one that worked with, instead against, the community. In 2016, she helped pass the first new rent control law to take effect in California in 30 years. Her book, Winning Richmond: How a Progressive Alliance Won City Hall, is available online. Gayle has never taken any corporate money in her campaigns and she has won every one thus far. Her enlightened leadership has altered Richmond but, as she says, there is much to be done to keep the progressive values and gains alive. Which is why she is running for the Richmond City Council again.

Gayle’s first book, Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money, and the Remaking of an American City, was published in 2017 with a foreword written by Bernie Sanders. In 2019, her political memoir, Winning Richmond: How a Progressive Alliance Won City Hall, is literally a how-to for radically changing city governments. In all of her campaigns for public office, she has never taken any money from corporations.

Friday, June 26 at 4:00 pm, Pacific Daylight Time.

Tickets: $20 General. * $15 for Praxis Members – Zoom link sent upon Registration. Click Here to Register. If you cannot afford a ticket or need a reduced fee, please Contact: info@praxispeace.org  

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