Monthly Archives: June 2017

The war against cash continues apace

Thanks to Michael Nevradakis for his excellent article, How Greece Became A Guinea Pig For A Cashless And Controlled Society, that recently appeared in Mint Press News.

The world has long been heading toward a neo-feudal world order headed by a global elite that uses its control of money, banking and finance to fleece and disempower the masses. Georgetown Professor and Bill Clinton’s mentor Carroll Quigley, told us 50 years ago that:
“The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world’s central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank . . . sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world.”
––Prof. Carroll Quigley, Georgetown historian, mentor of former President Clinton, and author of Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, 1966, p. 324.

To anyone who cares to look, it is clear to see how that precise agenda has been playing out over the past several decades, and what the end state will be. The war against cash is a logical next step in achieving the plan that Quigley outlined. I strongly urge the reader to study Nevradakis’ entire article here.

Democratizing capitalism

Cutting Edge Capital’s Vice-President Brian Beckon provides a crash course on investing and community development, and describes how ordinary people can invest some of their savings in local profit-making ventures that conform to their values. The strategies being worked out by his firm are aimed at creating healthier, more resilient and self-reliant communities while enabling small investors to earn a share of the profits generated by businesses that they believe in and wish to support. Approaches like these are essential to building a more democratic and equitable economy. Listen here.

What in the world is going on? — Part 2

Paul Craig Roberts has been inside and outside of the U.S. Government. He served under President Ronald Reagan and was a colleague of Zbigniew Brzezinski at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where Roberts occupied the William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy. He has had a unique vantage point from which to observe over his long career the dynamics of power and global developments. His website is a treasure trove of commentary that provides clear insight into what in the world is going on.

His recent post, Washington’s Empire Is Not Unraveling,  argues that despite president Trump’s recent actions, the military-industrial-financial complex remains firmly in control and the agenda of “full spectrum dominance” is still on track.

He points out that, with the help of the mains stream media, “Americans and the world are blinded to the fact that there are power centers that constrain a president and are capable of substituting their agendas for the agendas on which the president campaigned.”  Read the full article here.

And for insights into how the global financial system is malfunctioning, in addition to David Stockman, whom I mentioned in Part 1, you also need to follow Chris Martenson via his website, Peak Prosperity. In this video, https://youtu.be/E1g57mjGcGc he talks about the massive inflation of money that has characterized recent actions by three major central banks, the Federal Reserve, the Bank of Japan, and the European Central Bank. All three have been furiously “printing money” which they use to buy securities, thus creating asset bubbles–not a good sign for long-term prospects.

How to Bring Liquidity Into an Economy, Free of Interest, Inflation, and Boom and Bust Cycles

Abstract
Most economies suffer from a lack of liquidity, especially outside the large corporate and government sectors. This lack of means of payment (liquidity) is a fundamental cause of unemployment and failures of small and medium sized businesses (SMEs). It generally derives from flaws that are inherent in the centrally controlled systems of money and finance and the increasing indebtedness of both the private and public sectors. The surrender of monetary sovereignty by national governments to central banks, and to currency unions, such as the Euro, and their increasing indebtedness, as in  as in the case of Greece, have made it virtually impossible for their economies to thrive.

This article describes how domestic or community liquidity, i.e., means of payment, that enable the process of reciprocal exchange of value, can be created by various entities at various levels, from communities and business associations, to municipal governments and agencies, to national governments. The main obstacles to their implementation are not economic, but organizational and political, yet there is still considerable leeway within which the value of local production can be monetized in the form of circulating private currencies and trade credits created within associations of buyers and sellers. This article describes how that can be done.

Read the complete article here.

This subject will be the main focus of my upcoming workshop in Greece, 16-23 June. You still have time to register and space is still available.