About

Thomas H. Greco, Jr.

Thomas H. Greco, Jr. is an, independent scholar, author, educator, and community economist, who, for the past 30 years, has been working at the leading edge of transformational restructuring. He is widely regarded as a leading authority on moneyless exchange systems, community currencies, financial innovation, and community economic development, and is a sought after speaker internationally. He has traveled widely in Europe, Asia, Australia, and the Americas, lecturing, teaching, and advising. He has been a speaker at numerous conferences and has led many workshops and colloquia in 14 countries.

His recent speeches have included, in 2013, the Second International Conference on Complementary Currency Systems in The Hague; 2012, the Public Banking Institute conference; 2011, the Financial Planning Association Retreat in Florida, and the MINT film festival in Toronto;  2010, the International Commons Conference in Berlin, Germany.  He has spoken at three annual conventions of the International Reciprocal Trade Association (IRTA), the trade association for the commercial “barter” industry (2006,2009,2013); the Economics of Peace Conference in California in 2009, the Gold Dinar Conference in Malaysia in 2007, and the conference on Knowledge, Business and Consciousness held at the international community of Auroville, India in 2006, among many others.

He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent book, The End of Money and the Future of Civilization (Chelsea Green, 2009), is both descriptive of the essence of money and its historical evolution, and prescriptive of actions that can be taken by communities, businesses, and governments to enhance economic stability through liberation of the exchange process. His previous books on complementary currencies and exchange systems are Money: Understanding and Creating Alternatives to Legal Tender (Chelsea Green, 2001) and New Money for Healthy Communities (1994), which describe voluntary alternatives to conventional money that empower communities and reward people fairly. His first book, Money and Debt: A Solution to the Global Crisis (1990) explained the dysfunctional nature of conventional political money, outlined the principles upon which a more ideal money system can be structured, and proposed a plan for solving the global debt crisis and making the transition to an interest-free, harmonious economic and financial world order.

He has written for a wide range of journals including, the Internet Journal of Community Currency Research, Alternet, Reality Sandwich, The Whole Earth Review, World Business Academy Perspectives, At Work, Earth Island Journal, The Catholic Worker, The Permaculture Activist, Permaculture Drylands Journal, Green Revolution, Fourth World Review, and others.

A former college professor, he is currently Director of the non-profit Community Information Resource Center, a networking hub that provides information access and administrative support for efforts in community resilience, social justice, and sustainability. He maintains an active correspondence and major web presence through his websites Beyond Money (http://beyondmoney.net/) and Reinventing Money (http://reinventingmoney.com/).

Mr. Greco holds an MBA (Business Administration) from the University of Rochester and a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Villanova University. He spent a year in residence doing doctoral study in Management, and Instructional Technology at Syracuse University. His work experience includes 5 years as an aerospace engineer and 14 years in academia where he held a tenured faculty position at Rochester Institute of Technology. His expertise includes monetary theory, complementary currency and exchange systems, computer applications, statistics and survey research.

He can be reached at thgreco@mindspring.com

#     #     #

8 responses to “About

  1. I am interested to find you. My company distributes your book in South Africa http://sa.kimabooks.com/World-Planetary-Healing/The-End-of-Money. I am also a founder member of our local CES (www.community-exchange.org.za) and asked the publisher Floris Books if there was any way we could at least pay a portion in Talents (our local currency), but they declined. The CES (aka The Talent Exchange) has been very successful with over 5000 members locally and branches around the world.

  2. It’s a pity yyou don’t have a donqte button!
    I’d certainly donate tto this exfellent blog!
    I guess foor nnow i’ll settle forr boolmarking annd adfding
    yoiur RSS feed to myy Google account. I lok forwar to fresh updattes aand
    will talk about this sijte with mmy Facebook group. Chat soon!

  3. Hi, I just came across your site. It is full of fascinating insight. Last week I did a blog post on this topic too:

    http://directeconomicdemocracy.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/globalization-triffins-dilemma-and-demurrage-crypto-currency/

    I guess the concept of an international currency for cross boarder exchange is like the dinar idea you describe in your blog except that I thought it important to have demurrage and constant replacement to keep the stock distributed and in circulation.
    best wishes, Stone.

  4. Wanted to share my latest video, Money From Nothing:

    Feel free to share, link or embed …

    Thanks for your time,

    -Roman Be

  5. Hi!

    I came across your blog through a news link. I am working on a large scale project with a local directory type site. I am a firm believer in alternative currencies & would like to pitch an idea related to alternative currency to the top management. What would be the best way to get in touch with you?

    Thanks!
    Ani

  6. Hi,

    I have landed on your site and I am extreamely interested to talk about my current project of opening up a new Barter company with a number of innovative features that will set it apart from the rest.

    Your input to my thoughts may be very positive.

    How can I arrange to talk?

    Steve Rayne

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s